UN with EU, Germany, Canada and Sweden support scales up cash-based food assistance to reach 142 000 people in Swaziland

Swaziland_UNCT_beneficiary recieving money from a mobile money agentA beneficiary of the Cash Based Transfers receiving their monthly cash benefit from a MTN Mobile Money agent. WFP Swaziland©2017

 

As part of the overall national emergency response to the El Niño-induced drought, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) scaled up its cash-based interventions to reach 142,000 food insecure people in 2017 from the 30,000 assisted in 2016.

Achieved through support from the EU, Germany, Canada and Sweden, the interventions introduced in October 2016 marked the first use of Cash Based Transfers (CBT) modalities, in Swaziland for WFP.

WFP closed the emergency operation to coincide with the end of the lean season in May 2017, but the use of CBT remains a feature of the UN’s support to the country in the post-emergency environment. The transfers are done at household level, based on the number of people per household.

 

Swaziland_UNCT_Bongekile recieving her monthly cash benefitBongekile receiving a monthly cash benefit. WFP Swaziland©2017

Bongekile Nkhonyane, mother of 9 children and a beneficiary of the CBT, collects her household’s monthly benefit of SZL110 per person from a local mobile money agent to buy food for her household.

“The money I receive has helped me and my family so much. I used to work in the farms to try to provide food for my family, but because of the drought I could only afford one meal a day. The money I get helps me buy enough food to feed my family three meals a day,” she narrated 

Swaziland_UNCT_Bongekile buying food from a local supermarketBongekile buying food from a local supermarket. WFP Swaziland©2017

 

Upon receiving her monthly benefit, Bongekile goes to a local supermarket in Nkilongo, a small community in the Lubombo region of Swaziland, one of the worst drought-affected regions with 46 percent of people identified as food insecure. 

Upon receiving her monthly benefit, Bongekile goes to a local supermarket in Nkilongo, a small community in the Lubombo region of Swaziland, one of the worst drought-affected regions with 46 percent of people identified as food insecure. 
Upon receiving her monthly benefit, Bongekile goes to a local supermarket in Nkilongo, a small community in the Lubombo region of Swaziland, one of the worst drought-affected regions with 46 percent of people identified as food insecure. 
Upon receiving her monthly benefit, Bongekile goes to a local supermarket in Nkilongo, a small community in the Lubombo region of Swaziland, one of the worst drought-affected regions with 46 percent of people identified as food insecure. 
Upon receiving her monthly benefit, Bongekile goes to a local supermarket in Nkilongo, a small community in the Lubombo region of Swaziland, one of the worst drought-affected regions with 46 percent of people identified as food insecure. 
Swaziland_UNCTSelected items in Bongekile's shopping list. WFP Swaziland©2017

 

Bongekile selects the food items she needs the most, including a bag of maize meal, beans, cooking oil, salt, soap which help sustain her family.

 

Swaziland_UNCT_Bongekile smiles at a cash registerBongekile smiles at a cash register. WFP Swaziland©2017

 

WFP’s cash assistance helps increase accountability for the people we help and reduce the costs of delivering humanitarian aid. In addition, increases financial inclusion by linking people with payment systems as well as provide families, like Bongekile’s, with choice and more control over their own lives.

 

Find out more:

·         UN with support of EU delivers food assistance through mobile phone technology

·         WFP ends emergency operation that helped many cope with severe drought in Swaziland